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Download UPD Unreal Gold PC Game 1998



Installing the Unreal DirectX11 Renderer allows you to play the game in high-resolution, widescreen, and Direct3D 11. It is also worth noting that the DX11 renderer will work with the 227 Oldunreal Patches. As of December 30, 2020, the latest Unreal DirectX11 Renderer has ended support for this game.[3] The last supported version is version 1.6.1.




Download Unreal Gold PC Game 1998



Various modifications, custom content such as characters, maps, plugins, and total-conversion mods can be downloaded and installed for Unreal. Like every game in the Unreal franchise, there's a ton of mods floating around the web on fansites like Oldunreal.


However, as the description notes, you must change the FMODDevices to 27 in [ALAudio.ALAudioSubsystem] section in UnrealLinux.ini (Located in System folder) when you change the settings in-game. If the music does not work, get the 32-bit esound package (Sometimes it can be called esd) from the package manager or download one, run esd in Terminal once, then change FMODOutput to ESD in the same section.


Unreal is a first-person shooter video game developed by Epic MegaGames and Digital Extremes and published by GT Interactive for Microsoft Windows in May 1998. It was powered by Unreal Engine, an original game engine. The game reached sales of 1.5 million units by 2002.


Since the release of Unreal, the franchise has had one sequel and two different series based on the Unreal universe. One official bonus pack, the Epic-released Fusion Map Pack, can be downloaded free of charge. Unreal Mission Pack: Return to Na Pali, developed by Legend Entertainment, was released in June 1999, and added 17 new missions to the single-player campaign of Unreal. Unreal and Return to Na Pali would later be bundled together as Unreal Gold. Additionally, the games were updated to run on the Unreal Tournament version of the game engine.


Unreal was one of the first games to utilize detail texturing. This type of multiple texturing enhances the surfaces of objects with a second texture that shows material detail. When the player stands within a small distance from most surfaces, the detail texture will fade in and make the surface appear much more complex (high-resolution) instead of becoming increasingly blurry.[11] Notable surfaces with these special detail textures included computer monitors, pitted metal surfaces aboard the prison ship, golden metal doors, and stone surfaces within Nali temples. This extra texture layer was not applied to character models. The resulting simulation of material detail on game objects was intended to aid the player's suspension of disbelief. For many years after Unreal's release (and Unreal Tournament's release), detail texturing only worked well with the S3 MeTaL and Glide renderer. It was, in fact, disabled in the Direct3D renderer by default (but could be re-enabled in the Unreal.ini file) due to performance and quality issues caused by the driver, while it was present even on hardware many times more powerful than the original S3 Savage3D and 3Dfx Voodoo Graphics.


In the United States, Unreal finished 1998 as the year's 13th-biggest computer game seller, with sales of 291,300 units and revenues of $10.96 million.[48] Its ARP for the year was $38.[49] According to GameDaily, the game's sales in the United States reached 350,000 units by January 1999.[50] Worldwide sales surpassed one million units by September 1999,[51] and reached 1.5 million copies by November 2002.[52]


  • UnrealMedia typeVideogameRelease datesMay 22, 1998WWRatingELSPA: 15+ESRB: M Succeeded by CreditsSee the full list in the Credits section.Developed byEpic Games

  • Digital Extremes

  • Published byGT Interactive

  • Producer(s)Jason Schreiber

  • Designer(s)James Schmalz

  • Cliff Bleszinski

  • Programmer(s)Tim Sweeney

  • Steven Polge

  • Erik De Neve

  • Artist(s)James Schmalz

  • Mike Leatham

  • Artur Bialas

  • Composer(s)Alexander Brandon

  • Michiel van den Bos

  • ReceptionSee the full award list in the Awards section.AwardsIGNPC.com - Best Graphics (1998)[1]

  • PC Gamer Magazine - Top 50 Games of All Time (1998)[1]

  • Gamespot - Best Graphics (Technical Excellence) (1998)[1]

  • PC World Magazine - Top 100 Products (1998)[1]